How to use acupressure to relieve nausea

acupressure for nausea

Nausea just seems to be a part of life, whether it comes from pregnancy, a night out, chemotherapy, or motion sickness. You may have heard of acupuncture, a type of therapy that uses needles; Aku, however, is a therapy that simply relies on massaging key pressure points to alleviate specific symptoms. Although studies are still needed to prove its effectiveness, acupressure is a quick, inexpensive way to treat nausea — with no harmful side effects. Teach yourself the location of the pressure points, then apply your knowledge using your fingers or a bracelet and start feeling relief!

Using your fingers

Relax your arms and put them in the right position.

Lay your arms out in front of you with your fingers and palms facing up. Relax your shoulders and take a few deep breaths. You can use acupressure anywhere, but you should make yourself as comfortable as possible.

Locate the pressure point on your arm.

Place three fingers of your other hand just below the crook of your wrist. Place your thumb directly under them, centered between the two large tendons. This is the pressure point. More specifically, you’re looking for the P6 pressure point, also called the Inner Gate, which relieves nausea. The same point on the opposite side of your arm is called SJ5, or the Outer Gate.

Use your fingers to press on the acupressure point.

Take your thumb and your index or middle finger and if you feel nauseous, press firmly on this point from either side of your wrist. Then massage it in circular motions for a few minutes. Be sure to apply gentle pressure as you do so. You may feel relief right away, but sometimes it can take up to five minutes. Repeat this process on your other wrist.

Gently tap your wrists together at the acupressure points.

Take a deep breath and simply tap them together quickly several times. It doesn’t matter which arm is on top. If you want, you can alternate the position of your arms. Do this for a few minutes until you feel the nausea decrease. Some find it easier to tap or rub arm joints together than to locate and massage the P6 pressure point. Try tapping if you are still having trouble finding the exact position of the pressure point.

Locate the pressure point below your knee.

Find the bottom of your kneecap and measure four fingers down from that point. Place one finger of your other hand directly under the bottom of your measuring fingers (your pinky) and to the outside of your shinbone. When you find the right spot, you can feel a muscle tighten as you move your foot up and down. More specifically, you’re looking for ST36, also called Three Miles, which is one of the most commonly used pressure points because it stimulates cellular nourishment and energy flow.

Apply pressure to the point below your knee.

Using your finger, a fingernail, or the heel of your other foot, press firmly on this point. You can put pressure on it without massaging it, but you can also rub up and down at the pressure point. Whatever you decide to do, you should apply pressure to this point for several minutes.

Using a bracelet

Get a bracelet.

Anti-nausea bracelets are designed to apply pressure to the correct acupressure point on your wrist. They usually have a tab or flat button overlying the acupressure point. They come in different models and are usually made of knitted fabric, plastic or woven nylon. Choose a bracelet that fits your preferences, budget, and style of dress.

Create your own bracelet.

If you don’t want to spend money on a special bracelet, you can also make your own using a watch or sweatband and a small stone or button. Simply place the stone or button under the bracelet and fasten.

Locate the pressure point on your arm.

Place three fingers of your other hand just below the crook of your wrist. Place your thumb directly under them, centered between the two large tendons. This is the pressure point. More specifically, you’re looking for the P6 pressure point, also called the Inner Gate, which relieves nausea. The same point on the opposite side of your arm is called SJ5, or the Outer Gate.

Slide the bracelet to the right spot.

Make sure that the plate, button, bead or stone rests directly on the pressure point. Then, tie the bracelet so that you feel moderate to strong pressure at that point. The bracelet should not be able to slide around your wrist, but should stay firmly in place. But also make sure that the bracelet is not too tight. It mustn’t hurt you. If it does, however, you’ll need to loosen it up a bit. You may feel relief right after the wrap. But once your body gets used to it, you’ll need to squeeze the pressure point extra for relief.

Tips

Gentle pressure is usually already effective. Don’t push too hard and stop if it hurts or makes you uncomfortable. Keep your arms and shoulders relaxed.

Warnings

If you suffer from chronic nausea, you should definitely seek medical advice as well, even if this method works for you. This is only temporary help. This is acupressure and not acupuncture points. No needles are used!

 

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